#MeToo, Weinstein, and Real Stories

See my latest post on Medium. Here’s a preview:

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Harvey Weinstein is outed. Women all over the world are revealing their abuse at his hands. Too soon after that, the criticism starts — not of the predator, but of his prey.

“Why didn’t she speak up?”

“Why did she go to to the hotel.”

“She must have wanted it.”

Someone eventually utters that age-old excuse for misogyny, “they asked for it.”

Today, however, those words are the catalyst for a social media movement where #MeToo was born. The stories are from everyone and everywhere, and the black community is not exempt.

Read more at Medium.

Fresh off the Presses!

Here are some new work published in recent weeks. I am posting from newest to oldest. The first was freshly published today!

This Mama is Tapping Out: The NRA, Gun Lobby, or President Trump Can Explain This Mass Shooting My Kids

From Medium.

WHAT MY KID’S (VERY SHORT) FOOTBALL CAREER CAN TEACH PRESIDENT TRUMP ABOUT “RESPECT”

From Wear You Voice Magazine

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When my son was five, we signed him up to play America’s game. No not baseball—football! It was the Pop Warner League, which worked to teach young boys the basic football skills. I remember spending August through October at the side of the field with other parents (because the coach had threatened us at orientation with “the boot” if we wandered onto his field during practice and games) as we watched the tiny guys clad in tanks, tees, and cleats running around the field like little bobbleheads in their helmets. The coach, whose kid was also on the team, told us that he only had a few goals for the boys that year:

  •    To learn respect for adults
  •    To learn to work as a team
  •    To learn the basics of football
  •    To form a straight, unmoving line on the field…

THE BEAUTY OF BLACKNESS AND REPRESENTATION IN ‘THE POWERPUFF GIRLS’

On Wear Youn Voice Magazine

There used to be only one way to get my three girls, ages 2, 4, and 6 to settle down long enough to give me a break. I would pop in a DVD of The Powerpuff Girls cartoons or turn to a marathon on Cartoon Network. The girls would watch the show, mesmerized by the colors, the story, and the action for at least a half hour.

They each had a designated Powerpuff Girl. The oldest was Blossom, the four-year-old was Buttercup, and the youngest was always Bubbles. They would keep these parts for years, and act out their own fights for the safety of Townsville in my living room. Many a lamp and three couches were sacrificed to the cause….

 

 

View story at Medium.com

View story at Medium.com